FESTIVAL DE JEREZ 2012. 'MUDANZAS BOLERAS 1812-2012'

Ballet shoes and castanets

Silvia Calado. Jerez, March 4th, 2012


 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012'. Guest artists: Francisco Velasco (El Romancero) y Penélope Sánchez (Maestra de baile 'La Campanera'). La Maja: Elena Miño. El Torero: Daniel Morillo. La Francesa: Myriam Manso. El Majo: Sergio Bernal. Music: Agustín Diassera y Paco Cruzado. Script: Juan Vergillos, Sylvie Nys. Artistic direction: Sharon Sapienza. XVI Festival de Jerez. Teatro Villamarta. Jerez (Cádiz, Spain), March 5th 2012. 9 p.m.

Highslide JS
'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

That flamenco dancing isn’t all Spanish dance is something that Festival de Jerez has always wanted to highlight. But the truth is that there are few proposals on the market revolving around Spanish classical and, even fewer, around the bolero school. And it turned out to be more ideal than ever to have a new look at this discipline in 2012, the year in which the bicentennial is commemorated of the first Spanish constitution, passed in Cádiz in 1812; 'La Pepa'. These past two centuries are what is attempted to be traveled by 'Mudanzas boleras', a show which contributes freshness to the most delicate plot in our dance heritage.

With only six dancers on stage, each tackling a “figure” or character, a complete choreographic journey is traced designed by Francisco Velasco based on the legacy of the Pericet family. Thus, to the sound of musical versions of the old-time originals recorded with a perhaps too “midi” sound, they dance 'Soleares de Arcas', 'Panaderos de la flamenca', 'Sevillanas boleras', 'Jaleo de Jerez', 'Ole de la Curra', 'Boleras de la Cachucha'... and a nice 'Vito' which the maestro performs entirely enraptured. And the thing is that the show has its dramatic approach and even its gags, in a clear attempt to dust things off and communicate with new audiences. Which doesn’t take away a bit of rigor from each baile, performed with brilliant technique and just the right character by the stars, wearing ballet shoes and wielding castanets.

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'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

There were very few of them, but those who left the venue early because, surely, it wasn’t what they were seeking in Jerez, didn’t find out where one of the strongest roots begins from of what flamenco dancing is today, perhaps the one that gives it technical support and the one that made it easier to professionalize. Well, know that in 1812, Cádiz was full of theaters, that the Andalusian subject matter was already triumphing there and in Europe, and that boleros and boleras had ballrooms and academies as their habitat. And today’s bailaores and bailaoras, many of whom have spent many hours at the conservatory clutching a ballet bar, know it all too well.

Photo gallery, by Daniel Muñoz.
'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012'

© Daniel Muñoz

 

 

 

 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

 

'Mudanzas boleras 1812-2012' (Photo Daniel Muñoz)

 


Pedro Heredia 'El Granaíno'
Sala Compañía, 7 p.m.

 
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Pedro Heredia 'El Granaíno'
(Photo Festival de Jerez - Javier Fergó)
This evening is a dream come true for me”. And it was to sing solo in Jerez. Pedro Heredia 'El Granaíno' did so for the first time at the Palacio de Villavicencio, accompanied on guitar by Juan Requena. The cantaor, who was surprising last year in his face-off with La Farruca, summarized his credentials in an hour before a crowd full of listeners captivated by his cante without a mike. This cantaor’s peculiar timbre won them over; that and the energy he put into each and every one of the styles he tackled, from granaína to malagueña to fandangos, with soleá por bulerías in between. But there were two key moments. One of them was the seguiriya with which, using Tomás Pavón, he ended up opening his heart. And the other, the vibrant bulería medley dedicated to maestro Camarón, “one of my idols”. And it’s true that he has that influence, but also others and, more importantly, personality. And he stressed it in the encore, a cante-song which he said you need tuning and heart to sing.

And tomorrow...

· Vicente Gelo, Palacio de Villavicencio. 7 p.m.
· Gerardo Núñez, 'Made in Jerez'. 9 p.m.

Flamenco guitar will be the star of this twelfth day of Festival de Jerez 2012. Gerardo Núñez, a Jerez-born artist of the world, appears in concert with 'Made in Jerez'. And he vindicates the “artists from Jerez who have had the restlessness to draw on other sources and come home to enhance the flamenco in Jerez”. On stage with him at the Teatro Villamarta will be bailaor Alfonso Losa as guest artist, Manuel Valencia on second guitar, cantaores David Carpio and Rafael de Utrera, contrabass player Pablo Martín and percussionist Ángel Sánchez 'Cepillo'. In the evening at the Palacio de Villavicencio, Sevillian cantaor Vicente Gelo, who has been the voice of the Ballet Flamenco de Andalucía, will offer the last cante recital in the 'Los conciertos de palacio' Series, which will be closed by guitarist Antonio Rey next Thursday.

Further information

FESTIVAL DE JEREZ 2012
Official website · Ticket sales

All about Festival de Jerez 2012: reviews, photos, videos, galleries...

The show 'Mudanzas boleras' reconstructs two hundred years of Spanish dance history

Festival de Jerez 2012 hosts new flamenco baile and Spanish dance premieres

Visit the international flamenco festivals agenda
www.flamencofestival.info

 


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